Explore the Legacy

In 1874 at Syracuse University, students and friends Helen M. Dodge, Frances E. Haven, E. Adeline Curtis and Mary A. Bingham decided it was time to break gender alienation on their campus. In effort to create a welcoming and supportive environment for collegiate women, they founded Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. 

Fast-forward to today and the Sorority, which was the first female organization to be coined with that name, continues to be a safe haven for all 250,000 (and counting) of its members. Because our organization’s past plays such an integral role in understanding the importance of membership, we have created a website specifically dedicated to helping users explore the legacy our Founders created. From the Founders’ first meeting in 1874 to the introduction of new initiatives to improve membership experience in the 21st century, GammaPhiBeta.org/History provides an inside look into our past and present.

Our History

PRESERVE OUR LEGACY Through digitalization

Gamma Phi Beta has partnered with HistoryIT to digitize our vast archives and museum so all members have access to the 150 years of memories, milestones and sisterhood. Once held at International Headquarters or individual collegiate chapters, a selection of our wealth of historical materials, including photographs, letters, scrapbooks, jewelry and more will now be accessible digitally. Preservation of our heritage is essential, and we are proud to embark on this partnership and bring our archives and museum to life.  

You’ll soon be able to explore the photos, documents and memorabilia that share our stories in our digital museum. 

Preserve your chapter history

With 80% of our shared history living at our collegiate chapter, the best way to preserve the memory of every member is through digital chapter museums. Consider the stories your own chapter has to tell and contact us to find out how to save them. 

Learn More

DONate

We are looking for dedicated sisters to help fund this ambitious endeavor. If you are interested in learning more about our preservation efforts, please contact Chief Development Officer, Beth Vaughn. 

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